Amazing Federal Antique in Duxbury, MA

 

942 Tremont Front Ext

I wanted to share images of this amazing antique Federal house that’s currently on the market. It’s actually next door to where I grew up in Duxbury, MA and I’ve never been inside. If you look past the house on the right side of the image, you can see some trees through the trees – that’s where my house was. Up the hill, set back from the road. This yellow house (which has always been yellow since I lived there) is the Captain Gamaliel Bradford House, built in 1807. It’s on the National Register of Historic Places. On the left side of the image above, you can see the top of a gray house, which is the Bradford House, which is owned and run as a house museum by the Duxbury Rural and Historical Society.

House plaque

There have been a lot of Bradfords in Plymouth and Duxbury, starting with the Governor William Bradford, second governor of Plymouth Colony, signatory to the Mayflower Compact. High school friends are Bradfords as well. Gamaliel fought in the Revolutionary war (enlisting at age 13) and went on to be a privateersman, commanding many private ships. He was offered the helm of the ship Boston by then president John Adams, but declined. In 1944 the destroyer Bradford was named in his honor. Kind of cool. Meanwhile, he built himself and his wife, and seven children, a lovely house.

The image below is technically the back of the house, but it’s situated kitty corner to the road, on a bend in the road, and this view is the most prominent public view of the house. The image at top, the real front of the house, is behind trees and bushes and less obvious from the road.

942 Tremont Rear ext

This brick patio could sure be pretty. The glass entry was an add-on at some point I would think. Since this became the de-facto main entrance to the house (the driveway is on this side) my guess is someone felt the need for something either more formal looking, or at least more practical as it can be used as a kind of mudroom.

Exterior patio

Mudroom 1

 

And this is the rear entrance and hall, which leads straight to the front of the house, in typical Federal style.

 

Back hall 1

And this is the front hall, leading from the rarely used main entrance. The painted floors and stairs look like they could use some work, but are pretty amazing. The staircase is narrow and the newel post, banister and balusters are fairly plain.

Front Hall 1

The images below come from several different photo shoot periods, as the furniture has changed around somewhat. There are two back to back rooms with a large glass door separating them. They feature the same wallpaper and painted floors.  I believe they are all the same room, which is the parlor in the rear of the house, to the right of the back door (and across the hall from the dining room).

Family room 1

 

Family room 2

The image below shows the “front” room of the house through the glass doors, though I don’t have photos taken in that room. Note the gorgeous crown moldings. The windows all look to have their original shutters. Hopefully the next owners will take down the blinds. I’m sure split shutters would have been easier to deal with – giving privacy while still letting in light at the top.

Sitting Room 1

Sitting room 2

Glass door

This room below would be the parlor in the front of the house to the right of the front door, or it maybe known as the West parlor. In the image below, you can see the dining room through the doors.

Peach room 5

Peach room 4

 

Peach room 3

And here’s the dining room, which is on the left side of the back entrance. The door to the right of the window goes to the attached ell, which is the kitchen. Love the crystal chandelier (though it could be lower).

Given the relatively simple mantel and narrow wood planks on the floors, I wonder if this was originally a winter kitchen?

Dining room 4

Dining room 3

And here’s the kitchen which is in the ell off the rear of the house. You can see the door to the dining room, top right of the photo. How amazing is that dark blue breakfront on the right? This kitchen clearly needs a lot of work, but hopefully the new owners (and their designers) don’t gut it and take out all that is so charming.

Kitchen 1

 

Kitchen 4

So much to be done in the kitchen, but it could be so fantastic!!

Kitchen 3

Kitchen 2

Upstairs, we have what I assume is the large master bedroom. I’d love to see that wallpaper in person – I think I may love it. The wide pine floors are to die for.

Bedroom 1

Other bedrooms on the second floor:

Bedroom 4

That bedstead below is fantastic, isn’t it? I wonder where the little door in the corner goes to ?

Bedroom 3

This bedroom is on the third floor. Love the iron bed and white painted floors.

Bedroom 2

Another third floor space – which a tiny door in the corner.

Attic room 1

And unfinished attic space – lots of potential here.

attic

And bathroom spaces. This one on the third floor.

Bathoom 2

And this I assume is on the second floor.

Bathroom 1

Here’s a couple of detail shots:

Window detil

 

hardware detail

 

Swoon.

The house is listed by Petraglia Real Estate, who specializes in antique and historic homes.

The write up:

Welcome to the Historic Gamaliel Bradford House circa 1807. This extraordinary brick and clapboard sixteen room ship captains’ home, built in the Federal-style, with the finest quality detailing and high styling of the early 19th century. Lofty ceilings, crown moldings, wainscoting and original detail are all preserved along with large windows with arch tops flooding the interior with light. Major system updates include new electrical and new septic. The property includes a large two story barn that serves as garages and an extended garden work shed.The landscape includes boxwood gardens, peony and rose gardens, lawn and mature forest, a woodlands garden with a rustic folly. This important home is protected with historic preservation covenants that will be held by Historic New England. Ready for quality restoration.For the discerning buyer looking for an uncompromising historic home and landscape.

A very important note from above: “This important home is protected with historic preservation covenants that will be held by Historic New England. ” This means that there would be restrictions on how much renovation could be done to the house. As with any antique and especially historic home, buyers have to consider themselves stewards of history, not just homeowners. They take on the responsibility of caring for the house for the future. Not the right property for just any homeowner. Historic New England offers amazing information to owners of antique and historic homes and is a valuable resource.

The house is located at 942 Tremont Street, Duxbury, MA. It’s on the market for $975,000. You can see the listing here. I would venture to assume that the house needs another $200,000-$300,000 to update the kitchen, bathrooms, refinish floors, repairs, etc. Plus a hefty furniture budget (call me!).

Linda sig2

 

xoxo Linda Would you like my Favorite Tips for a Well-Decorated Home? Click here!

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