Property Swoon: A Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy

Traditional Home July August 2018 Farmhouse Fantasy cover Jim Westphalen photographer
Traditional Home August 2018 cover | Photo by Jim Westphalen | Produced by Karin Lidbeck Brent

Sometimes, a property just captures the essence of what’s popular (aka trendy) in design, but is also actually really good too, which doesn’t happen as often as one would think. This is the case with this gorgeous Vermont farmhouse fantasy home that was featured in both Design New England and Traditional Home magazines – in 2018. It’s very rare for a project to be featured – and make the cover – of two major publications in the same year. And not only that, the cover shots are nearly identical.  If this looks familiar, I also featured this shot when I was writing about the psychology of white rooms last week.

Design New England Vermont Farmhouse Jim Westphalen photograph Farmhouse fantasy Cover Jan Feb 2018
Design New England January/February 2018 Cover | Photo by Jim Westphalen | Produced by Jenna Talbott

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lee Grutchfield Architect Traditional Home exterior

A New England vernacular design vibe is captured with the simple, paired back architectural style with white clapboard siding, symmetrical windows with no shutters. It’s a lovely angular look that is traditional and yet still modern.

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lee Grutchfield Architect Traditional Home Exterior White House

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Exterior White Entry hall

The narrow lines of the black trim on the windows and entryway lantern are carried into the foyer with the lanterns inside as well. This truly carries the eye from outside in and inside out. Pro Tip from Edith Wharton: The front entry of a house should be a natural progression from outside to inside.

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Exterior White foyer antiques

Farmhouse Fantasy Kitchen

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Roundtree Construction Traditional Home White kitchen gray cabinets

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Roundtree Construction Traditional Home Kitchen teal blue white upholstered dining chairs

I’m a big fan of this mix of luxe dining chairs with the rustic farmhouse table. Note that the woods don’t have to match; the chair legs are a grayed natural wood which speaks to both the lower cabinetry and the natural wood tones of the table and ceiling beams. The upholstery also ads a much needed accent to warm up the space.

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Roundtree Construction Traditional Home White Kitchen

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Roundtree Construction Traditional Home Kitchen shiplap brass gray and white cabinets

The counter stools have the same colorful teal. And, I see there is a built-in space for the dog bowls at the end of the huge center island. Raised bowls are great for taller dogs as they age to avoid neck strain.

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Roundtree Construction Traditional Home Kitchen details cabinetry

Living Spaces – Farmhouse Fantasy

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Family room wood clad fireplace

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Blue library cabinets shelves

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Living room barn details wood beams

Private Spaces – Farmhouse Fantasy

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Master bedroom poster bed

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Bathroom freestanding tub

Entertaining Spaces – Farmhouse Fantasy

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Barn details

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Barn wood beams bar top

 

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Exterior pool glass and slate wall

 

Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy Lillian August Traditional Home Exterior pool

 

Design Credits and Applause for the Farmhouse Fantasy goes to:

Architect: Lee Grutchfield, AIA, TruexCullins Architects + Interior Design, Burlington, Vermont; 802/658-2775; lgrutchfield@truexcullins.com; truexcullins.com.
Interior designers: Richard Cerrone and Nancy Galasso, Lillian August Furnishings + Design, Lillian August Design Center, 32 Knight St., Norwalk, CT 06851; 203/847-3314; project@lillianaugust.com; lillianaugust.com.
Kitchen design-build firm: Dan Morris and Rick Santa Maria, Roundtree Construction, New Haven, Connecticut; 802/453-4044; roundtreeconstruction.com.

Read the entire Design New England story here, which has some different photos and views of this beautiful project.

View the Traditional Home photo spread here.

So, do you have a favorite cover image? I’m not going to pick because I actually know both stylists and they are both beautiful!

xoxo Linda Would you like my Favorite Tips for a Well-Decorated Home? Click here!

2 thoughts on “Property Swoon: A Vermont Farmhouse Fantasy

  1. Gorgeous! I have long had a fantasy of a Vermont farmhouse – mine would not be this spectacular, but not many houses would or could be. At any rate, the real estate prices are very friendly there, as are the people (an important consideration, relocating from Texas where we’re all pretty much friends even if we hate each other). The horses, the mountains, the University (my daughter wants to be a veterinarian – Vermont’s school is top tier) – what’s not to like??

    Our hang up is the snow. I can’t decide if we’re being practical or wimpy. I lived in Manhattan as a 20-something, but the two winters I was there were both relatively mild. I have this vision of renovating a New England house/barn/property over the spring and summer, then everything goes all The Shining over the winter. I wish I’d spent more time in the north much earlier in life.

    This was a beautiful feature, thank you! Have a great weekend.

    • Hi Rachel – The Shining – haha. Of course, it depends on where you are, some remote place would be pretty bleak in the winter I think. But living near a busier town or city – like Burlington VT – would be great. I almost moved to Burlington many years ago when I was up for a job. It’s a great little city.

      Your comment reminded me that Vermont is offering a $10,000 incentive for people who work remotely from home to move there. In other words, people whose jobs can be done from anywhere. They have an aging population and want to youthen things up a bit. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/01/us/vermont-moving-money.html Too funny.

      The weather here in New England isn’t as bad as people thing. It IS cold and bleak some times, but I think it’s a lot better than floods, hurricanes and wildfires that happen more ferociously elsewhere.

      Thanks for commenting – have a great weekend yourself!

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