A Spectacular Property Swoon: The Inn at Burklyn Hall Renovation

Just about 3 years ago, I wrote about a beautiful and historic property that was on the market in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont called Burklyn Hall. It’s kind of in the middle of a beautiful nowhere, but is an amazingly gorgeous estate that would need very special owners to purchase it. And so it happened! New owners Marci and Jim Crone embarked upon a full renovation this estate and spent many hours with local historians to learn all about the property and its history so they could bring Elmer Darling’s Burklyn Hall back to life. Jim undertook to design and manage all the renovation aspects of the project including millwork and bathrooms. 

For the decorations and furnishings, they brought in the amazing team of Tom and Cara Fox of Utah-based The Fox Group to help with Marci’s vision for a classic and traditional overall design and to provide sourcing for the beautiful furnishings and fabrics that have such timeless appeal.

The Inn at Burklyn opened to the public in 2020.

Let’s take a walk-thru and compare the images from the 2018 real estate listing with stunning photos of the new spaces of the Burklyn Hall renovation, shall we? (All photos of the Burklyn Hall renovation © and courtesy of Rodeo & Co. and are used with permission.)

First Floor Lobby – before

Burklyn Hall front hall

Burklyn Hall Front hall 2

First Floor Lobby – now

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation lobby
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

First Floor Sitting Room – Before

Burklyn Hall pink living room 2

 

First Floor Sitting Room – Now

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation sitting room
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

First Floor Sitting Room #2 – Before

Burklyn Hall Peach sitting room white moldings

I believe this is the same room based on the moldings, now a breakfast room.

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation breakfast room
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

Dining Room – Before

Burklyn Hall Dining room 2

Burklyn Hall Dining room paneling moldings

Dining Room – now

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation dining room 2
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

 Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation dining room
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation dining room photo styling Prism House
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission. Photo styling: The Prism House

Second Floor Landing – Before

Burklyn Hall library

Second Floor Landing – Now

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation upstairs hall
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

The Franconia Bedroom

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation bedroom a
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

The Brighton Bedroom

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation bedroom b Schumacher wallpaper
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

Bedroom – Before

Burklyn Hall green bedroom

The Egypt Bedroom – Now

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation bedroom floral ceiling
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation bedroom floral ceiling 2
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

Third Floor bathrooms and sitting area

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation 3rd floor bathroom
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.
Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation 3rd floor bathroom 2
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

 

Photo by Rodeo and Co Burklynn Hall renovation 3rd floor sitting area
Photo by Rodeo and Co. Used with permission.

I just adore the soft palette – it’s so romantic and soothing. The fact that all the original embellishments – moldings, ceiling medallions, floors seem to have been maintained is so wonderful. It’s a testament to the fact that they were in good condition to begin with but also that the Crone’s respected the history and were clearly dedicated to bringing it all up to date with respect and quality craftsmanship.  Read Rodeo & Co.’s blog post that has more photos and information. And of course, visit The Inn at Burklyn‘s website for the whole story!

xoxo Linda

5 thoughts on “A Spectacular Property Swoon: The Inn at Burklyn Hall Renovation”

  1. Hello Linda, Well, the limited sample we see does look pretty good. It shows that quality restoration work is possible, despite (other) people’s myriad excuses to the contrary. However I wonder to what extent this philosophy has been extended to the rest of the property, especially the service areas. My biggest disappointment with the part shown is the second floor landing, which looked so inviting before, and now looks cold and impersonal. Also, what is going on with the all-white books everywhere–do they only accept illiterate guests? (I apologize for being harsh, but my number one complaint in interior design, after safety issues, is disrespect for books, and I know that a lot of people agree with this.) They really have done some remarkable work, and the exterior is magnificent. Still, for a historic restoration it looks more like 2021 than 1904.

    Reply
    • Hi Jim – well, I couldn’t disagree with you more on your comment about the historic restoration looking too modern. The architecture and all detailing are original to the home and haven’t been changed – so it’s a wonderful and careful restoration in my opinion. The building was restored and likely with upgrades to the mechanicals like HVAC and plumbing. The decorating is another thing and let’s face it, they are marketing a resort not doing a house museum. But saying that, I think the decorative choices are very much of a piece to how these houses were done 100+ years ago. Edith Wharton’s The Mount in the Berkshires is much the same and that is a house museum. As for the service areas – again, since it’s not a house museum, I would guess the kitchens are lovely but modern and not true to what kitchens were like 120 years ago when houses had lots of staff to run things around and lots of hands in a kitchen. Re: the books, yes, they do use a lot of white book covers. What we don’t know is if they have noted the books on the covers – which some people do. Or are all they props. I’m a fan of the first – keep the book and cover it with a plain white cover with the title on the spine. It makes for a cleaner looking space, which again, has more mass appeal. But obviously, if one is drawn to books of any kind, then a big wall of books would be much more inviting and interesting.

      Reply
      • Hi again Linda, Please don’t get the wrong meaning of my comment. I agree with you fully that this appears to be a magnificent and careful restoration, far better than most we see, and that the owners seem to care about their historic building as well as making their inn as welcoming as possible. I did voice my strong opinion about the books, at the same time admitting that was my idiosyncratic take. If fact, many people historically have cared about the physical appearance of their books. Those who could afford it had them bound in beautiful and often uniform leathers. Samuel Pepys, the famous 17th century diarist, had small blocks of wood cut for his books so their top margins would all line up.
        .
        Of course I don’t think that the service areas should be restored in their entirety. The way I like to think of it is, if the original owner could magically be transported back into the kitchen, would he at least recognize that he was in his own house? Some of my comments really veered toward restorations in general–from what I saw I was very impressed with this one. Actually, many houses of this type have large, almost commercial kitchens meant for taking care of large house parties. And restorers can certainly have as many microwaves and as much stainless steel as they want, I just would hope that some vestige of the original remains, perhaps a tin ceiling or some original bead-boarding. You’ve probably gathered that I really love old houses–I am now putting together a post on one of my favorites.
        –Jim

        Reply

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